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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

jR^fUJALt ^EPO^T 



OF THE 



Receipt? and Expenditure? 



TOWN 0F CpELjagF0RD, OTS., 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



SCHOOLi ^EPO^T, 



FOR THE 



¥Em ENDING JTOCH 28", )887. 



LOWELL, MASS . 

VOX POPULI PRESS, 130 CENTRAL STREET. 
18 8 7. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



Town of Chelmsford 



(MASSACHUSETTS), 



Year Ending Feb. 28, 1887. 



LOWELL, MASS.: 
VOX POPULI PRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1887. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 

1886. 



Selectmen, Assessors, and Overseers of the Poor — Henry S. 
Peeham, Chas. W. Flint, John Q. Battles, R. Wilson Dix, Geo. 
F. Snow. 

Town Clerk — Geo. A. Parkhurst. 

Town Treasurer — Edwin H. Warren. 

School Committee — Three years: Edwin E. Dutton, Royal S. 
Ripley, Maecus H. Winship; two years: Nathan C. Saunders, 
T. S. Edmands, John C. Hobbs ; one year: Samuel J. Garland, 
Jas. H. Hazen, Geo. F. Locke. 

Collector of Taxes — Arthur H. Sheldon. 

Constables — Jas. P. Emerson, Alfred Day, John H. Whidden, 
Daniel W. Sleeper, Geo. F. Dyar, Samuel J. Garland. 

Highway Surveyor — Lyman S. Gale. 

Fence Viewers — Albion J. Lamphere, Daniel P. By am, Jas. 
P. Emerson. 

Appraisers of Personal Property at the Town Farm — Elisha 
H. Shaw, Daniel P. Byam, Jas. P. Emerson. 

Auditors — Ziba Gay, Edward F. Richardson, J. Adams Bart- 
lett. 

Weighers of Hay — Geo. A. Parkhurst, S. Waldo Parkhurst, 
Geo. W. Perry, Eben T. Adams, Elisha H. Shaw, Thomas M. 
Gerrish, Marcus H. Winship. 

Weigher of Coal — Marcus H. Winship. 

Measurers of Wood — Geo. A. Parkhurst, S. Waldo Park- 
hurst, Eli P. Parker, Elisha H. Shaw, Jas. P. Emerson, Geo. 
W. Perry. 

Surveyors of Lumber — R. Wilson Dix, Eli P. Parker. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures — True Morton. 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

For the Year Ending Feb. 28, 1887. 



Births recorded — Males, 33 ; Females, 24; total 57 

Births of native parentage 40 

Births of foreign parentage 8 

Births of native and foreign parentage 9 

Marriages recorded 14 

Marriages between natives 11 

Marriages between natives and foreigners 3 

Deaths recorded, 38 : Males, 20 ; Females, 18 38 

Number under 5 years of age 8 

Between 5 and 10 1 

Between 10 and 20 5 

Between 20 and 30 2 

Between 30 and 40 6 

Between 40 and 50 -. 2 

Between 50 and 60 6 

Between 60 and 70 3 

Between 70 and 80 4 

Between 80 and 90 1 

Causes of Death — lung diseases, 11; heart disease, 5; paralysis, 
3 ; Bright' s disease, 2 ; apoplexy, 2 ; typhoid fever, 2 ; infantile, 2 ; 
other causes, 11. 



REPORT ON DOG LICENSES. 

Paid into the treasury of Middlesex County on account of dog 
licenses, as per receipts of the Treasurer on file, dated respectively 
June 22, 1886, and Dec. 1, 1886, the sum of three hundred and 
ninety-seven dollars and twenty cents ($397.20). 

Number of dogs licensed 194 

Males 178 

Females 16 

Amount received for licenses $436 00 

Amount of fees (20 cents per license) 38 80 

Paid to the County Treasurer, as per above statement 397 20 

Ninety per cent, refunded 357 48 

GEORGE A. PARKHURST, 

Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

For the Year Ending Feb. 28, 1887. 



Your Treasurer charges himself with cash balance in treasury, as 

found at last annual settlement $ 308 59 

Cash received of — 

State Treasurer, as State Aid for 1885 443 00 

Relief to indigent soldiers and sailors, 72 00 

Corporation tax for 1886 1,377 86 

National Bank tax for 1886 1,427 15 

Armory rent 100 00 

Income Massachusetts school fund.. . 179 54 

County Treasurer, on account of dog licenses for 1886. . 357 48 

City of Boston, on account of aid for paupers 43 25 

Town of Billerica, on account of aid to paupers 5 00 

Matthias Hutching, on account of hospital bills 87 30 

Rev. N. C. Saunders, on account of sale of prepared wood, 27 51 

H. S. Perham, on account of sale of trash wood 9 00 

Rev. J. H. Vincent, on account of sale of books and 

school supplies 39 79 

City of Lowell, on account of tuition of non-resident 

pupils 22 75 

R. S. Ripley, on account of tuition of non-resident pupils, 28 55 
George Hyde, on account of tuition of non-resident pupils, 2 75" 
Rev. N. C. Saunders, on account of tuition of non-resi- 
dent pupils 2 00 

L. K. Howard, on account of sale of lots in cemetery at 

Centre 26 00 

Dawson Pollard, on account of sale of lots in cemetery at 

West Chelmsford 12 00 

1ST. B. Edwards, M. D., on account of sale of lots in 

cemetery at North Chelmsford 17 00 

D. P. Byam, on account of sale of lots in cemetery at 

South Chelmsford 7 00 

A. J. Lamphere, on account of use of Town Hall at 

Centre 42 90 

Amount carried forward $4,638 42 



Amount brought forward $4,638 42 

George E. Spalding, on account of use of Town Hall at 

North Chelmsford 6 00 

Overseers of Poor, as proceeds of Town Farm 713 15 

George F. Snow, tax of 1884 in full 105 44 

Interest on same 11 02 

A. H. Sheldon, as tax of 1885 553 48 

Interest on same 24 39 

As tax of 1886 15,278 24 

As interest on same 113 90 

Hired for use of Town as temporary loan 4,500 00 

Making a total of $25,944 04 

And is credited as follows: — 
By cash paid — 

State tax for 1886 $ 1,380 00 

Outstanding orders of 1885 in full 18 85 

Orders drawn present year 18,252 40 

For care of Kimball lot in Centre cemetery 5 00 

Temporary loan in full 4,500 00 

Interest on same 92 63 

Outstanding note of 1885 500 00 

Interest on same (one year) 25 00 

Balance in treasury as found on settlement 1,170 16 

$25,944 04 

E. H. WARREN, 

Treasurer. 
Chelmsford, March 3, 1887. 



REPORT OF THE ASSESSORS 

For the Year Ending Feb. 28, 1887. 



Valuation, May 1, 1! 



Real estate (resident) $1,111,440 00 

Real estate (non-resident) 204,790 00 

$1,316,230 00 

Personal estate (resident) $263,615 00 

Personal estate (non-resident) 2,500 00 

266,115 00 

Total valuation $1,582,345 00 



Number of polls 655 

Number of horses 417 

Number of cows 884 

Number of other neat cattle 30 

Number of swine 190 

Number of dwellings 568 

Total number of tax payers 997 

Number of property-tax payers 714 

Number of poll-tax payers only 283 

Number of acres of land taxed 14,132 

Valuation of buildings $665,280 00 

Valuation of land 650,950 00 

Taxes. 

Rate on $1,000, $10.00. Polls, $2.00 each. 

State tax $1,380 00 

County tax 829 67 

$2,209 67 



Amount carried forward $2,209 67 



Amount brought forward $2,209 67 

Appropriations for — 

Public schools 15,000 00 

School incidentals 450 00 

Text-books and supplies 400 00 

Poor , . 2,300 00 

Highways 3,500 00 

Public buildings 350 00 

Indigent soldiers and sailors 100 00 

Town officers and committees 750 00 

Collection and abatement of taxes 400 00 

Enforcement of the liquor law 400 00 

R,e-insurance of public buildings 300 00 

School-house at the Center 2,500 00 

Fire apparatus 600 00 

Road at West Chelmsford 400 00 

Well at South Chelmsford 75 00 

Miscellaneous expenses 250 00 

$17,775 00 

$19,984 67 
Overlayings 148 78 

$20,133 45 
Less estimated receipts 3,000 00 

Total tax committed $17,133 45 

Tax on 655 polls $ 1,310 00 

Tax on property 15,823 45 

: $17,133 45 

Miscellaneous. 

Appropriations, March, 1886, $3,325 more than March, 1885, — the 

direct cause of raising the rate of tax $2 on $1000. 
Average rate of tax in the State, $14.28 on $1000. 
Highest rate of tax in the State, $25.00 on $1000, in town of Florida. 
Lowest rate of tax in the State, $5.00 on $1000, in town of Groton. 

Valuation of buildings in the State $752,669,001 00 

Valuation of land in the State. 587,824,672 00 

Excess in valuation of buildings $164,844,329 00 

CHAS. W. FLINT, 
R. WILSON DIX, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
HENRY S. PERHAM, 
GEO. F. SHOW, 

Assessors. 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



Collector's report for the year 1884. 
Taxes on list of 1884, uncollected Feb. 27, 

1886- $105 44 

Interest on same to Feb. 27, 1886 10 46 

Interest accrued since Feb. 27, 1886 56 

$116 46 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax $105 44 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as interest 11 02 

$116 46 

Geo. F. Snow, Collector, 1881f. 

Collector's report for the year 1885. 
Taxes on list of 1885, uncollected Feb 28, 

1886 $571 32 

Interest on same to Feb. 28, 1886 16 66 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1886 9 49 

$f,97 47 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax $553 48 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as interest 24 39 

Uncollected taxes to new account 17 84 

Uncollected interest to new account 1 76 

$597 47 

Arthur H. Sheldon, Collector, 1885. 

Collector's report for the year 1886. 

Tax list for 1886 $17,133 45 

Additional taxes 7 75 

Interest collected since Oct. 1, 1886 113 90 

Interest accrued since Oct. 1, 1886, on uncol- 

colted taxes 30 64 

$17,285 74 

Cash paid County Treasurer as County tax. .$ 829 67 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax 15,278 24 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as interest 113 90 

Uncollected taxes to new account 1,033 29 

Interest accrued to new account 30 64 

$17,285 74 

Arthur H. Sheldon, Collector, 1886. 



No. 1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
4 
5 
5 
6 
7 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 

For the Year Ending Feb. 28, 1887. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

PAID FOR TEACHING. 

A. F. Gilbert, 33 weeks 1646 25 

Emma L. Pierce, 11 weeks 110 00 

Nellie M. Perham, 33 weeks 264 00 

Ada M. Sheldon, 22 weeks , 176 00 

Ray M. Hodsdon, 12 weeks 96 00 $1,292 25 

Helen J. Gookin, 15 2-5ths weeks. ... 123 20 

S. Eva Worthen, 5 weeks 40 00 

Blanche E. Henshaw, 13 weeks 104 00 267 20 

Araminta V. Paasch, 34 weeks 272 00 272 00 

Gertrude Byam, 34 weeks 272 00 272 00 

Ida E. Bvam, 18 weeks 108 00 

Lydia A."Haywood, 10 weeks 60 00 168 00 

Susie S. McFarlin, 34 weeks 289 00 289 00 

Etta G. Locke, 22 weeks 176 00 

Mary L. Keith, 10 weeks 80 00 256 00 

Geo. F. Partridge, 22 weeks 440 00 

Minnie A. Worden, 11 weeks 88 00 

Laura G. Hoyt, 34 weeks 272 00 

Addie M. Taylor, 34 weeks 272 00 

Hattie A. Burgess, 11 weeks 88 00 

Katie Sleeper, 12 weeks 96 00 

Virgil B. Wells, 7 weeks 148 75 

W. F. Parsons, 5 weeks 106 25 1,511 00 

Agnes Naylor, 34 weeks 272 00 

Carrie M. Bobbins, 34 weeks 272 00 544 00 

$4,871 45 



10 



PAID FOR CARE OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

No. 1, Alvin R. Saunders, care $17 60 

1, C. H. C. Hall, care 14 40 

1, Walter Perham, care 32 00 

1, Mrs. Hopkins, cleaning. ... 1 35 

1, Mrs. Nason, cleaning 25 

2, Henry Smith, care 16 50 

2, Mrs. John Smith, 2 days' cleaning. . . . 

3, Edgar R. Parker, care 

4, James H. Hazen, care 

4, James H. Hazen, cleaning 

5, Charles Dutton, care 

6, Thomas French, care 

6, James Bowdin, care 

6, P. D. and T. S. Edmands 

7, Guy E. Reed, care 

7, Geo. F. Locke, cleaning 

8, Willie H. Hall, care 

8, Willie H. Hall, cleaning 

9, John Dunn, care 



PAID FOR FUEL. 

No. 1, Harry L. Parkhurst, 42,840 lbs. coal. . 
1, David Perham, prepai-ed wood 

1, C H. C. Hall, preparing 96 feet wood, 

2, E. F. Richardson, 24 feet oak wood. . 

2, Thomas Sheehan, preparing oak wood, 

3, John Q. Battles, 32 feet oak wood. . . . 
3, S. J. Garland, 4 feet prepared wood. . 

3, William Wood, preparing wood 

4, James H. Hazen, 4 feet hard wood . . . 
4, James H. Hazen, 5 feet pine wood. ... 

4, Jas. H. Hazen, preparing 16 ft. wood, 

5, E. E. Dutton, 20 feet wood 

6, P. D. & T. S. Edmands 16 feet pre- 

pared wood 

6, P. D. & T. S. Edmands, 32 feet pre- 

pared pine wood 

7, Geo. F. Locke, 28 feet hard wood .... 
7, Geo. F. Locke, 4 feet pine wood 

7, William Martin, preparing wood .... 

8, S. P. Sampson, 152^ ft. prepared wood, 

9, Wm. C. Edwards, 64 ft. oak wood.. . . 
9, Wm. C. Edwards, 9 ft. pine wood. . . . 
9, John Dunn, preparing 73 feet wood. . 



14 00 



$65 60 



4 00 


20 50 


17 00 


17 00 


17 00 




3 00 


20 00 


6 00 


6 00 


5 00 




10 50 




1 50 


17 00 


16 00 




3 00 


19 00 


71 50 




9 45 


80 95 


25 00 


25 00 




$271 05 


28 52 




1 25 




9 00 


$138 77 


16 50 




3 75 


20 25 


20 00 




1 50 




6 00 


27 50 


3 25 




2 94 




3 00 


9 19 


10 00 


10 00 



20 00 


34 


00 


19 25 






2 25 






4 00 


25 


50 


95 81 


95 


81 


44 00 






4 50 






6 75 


55 


25 



$416 27 



11 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 

J. H. Vincent, superintendent $200 00 8200 00 

J. H. Vincent, express and expenses buying 

books and supplies 10 41 

J. H. Vincent, stationery 1 15 11 56 

Boston School Supply Co., desk and sup- 
plies 43 96 43 96 

J. Merrill & Son, ink 13 85 13 85 

Parmenter's Crayon Co., supplies 8 00 8 00 

No. 1, 1ST. C. Saunders, expense obtaining 

teacher 5 00 5 00 

1, S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 11 25 

1, E. Nettel, supplies 2 55 

1, Alvin Lawrence, clock 7 00 

1, James Stanley, repairing clock 35 

1, Alvin R. Saunders, repairs 65 

1, Bartlett & Dow, coal-sifter 75 22 55 

3, S. J. Garland, repairing fence 1 25 

3, A. G. Green, stove 4 00 

3, N. E. Parker, repairs 1 00 

3, D. W. Bickford, supplies 1 75 8 00 

4, James H. Hazen, supplies 6 36 6 36 

6, T. S. Edmands, supplies 1 55 1 55 

8, E. Shaw & Son, supplies 5 55 

8, Adams & Co., settees 9 00 

8, Willie Hall, supplies 1 50 

8, S. P. Sampson, repairing wall 6 00 

8, Geo. E. Spaulding, truant officer 8 72 30 77 

9, M. H. Winship, repairs 1 87 

9, W. H. Brown, repairs 1 20 

9, Dawson Pollard, repairs 25 

9, M. H. Winship, supplies 1 68 5 00 

$356 60 



SCHOOL TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Boston School Supply Co., books and sta- 
tionery $165 76 

Harper & Brothers, books 88 88 

Thompson, Brown & Co., books 102 96 

Cowperthwait & Co., books and charts 165 84 

Harrison Hume, books 30 95 

Chas. H. Whitney, books 21 68 

Marden & Rowell, blanks 8 50 

Geo. F. King & Merrill, stationery 8 70 

J. H. Vincent, service and expenses buying 

and delivering books and supplies 87 70 $680 97 



12 



SUPPORT OF THE POOR. 

PAID FOR EXPENSES OUTSIDE OF THE ALMSHOUSE. 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in support of 

Ephrairn Buttrick $ 59 87 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in support of 

EllaHutchins 88 23 1148 10 

Worcester Asylum for Chronic Insane, in 

support of Daniel Gilligan 175 26 175 26 

Danvers Lunatic Hospital, in support of Laura 

E. Bailey and Catherine McMahon 176 24 

Danvers Lunatic Hospital, in support of Cath- 
erine McMahon 85 87 262 11 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital, in support of 

Michael McKeon 177 53 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital, in support of 

Laura E. Bailey 101 53 279 06 

St. John's Hospital, in support of Thomas 

Lawler 104 27 104 27 

City of Lowell, in aid of children of Elizabeth 

Donahoe 37 50 37 50 

City of Boston, in aid of Asenath Clapp 78 34 78 34 

City of Lynn, in aid of Frank W. Wood .... 72 75 72 75 
E. Shaw & Son, in aid of Sarah Quessey (bill 

of 1885 ) 4 03 4 03 

E. Shaw & Son, in aid of Mrs. Jas. McEnnis, 99 11 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Mrs. Jas. McEnnis, 6 00 105 11 

E. Shaw & Son, in aid of Mrs. Geo. W. Copp, 24 96 

F. W. & F. F. Blodgett, in aid of Mrs. Geo. 

W. Copp 1 44 26 40 

S. W. Parkhurst, in aid of Jonathan Hopkins, 24 00 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Jonathan Hopkins, 6 40 30 40 

S. W. Parkhurst, in aid of Gilman Newton. . 5 00 

Mary W. Stevens, in aid of Gilman Newton. . 6 00 11 00 

Albert Kemp, in aid of Mrs. Stillman Byam, 28 00 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Mrs. Stillman Byam, 15 25 43 25 

Sarah E. Whitten, in aid of Jeremiah Crowley, 12 00 

Seth Sampson, in aid of Mrs. Jane McEnnis, 2 50 14 50 

Daniel W. Bickford, in aid of George Hall. . 10 00 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Geo. Hall's family, 22 90 32 90 

Mrs. John Knowles, in aid of Henry Drake . 16 10 

Annie Booth, in aid of Henry Drake 3 75 19 85 

John J. Dunn, in aid of Thos. Charlesworth, 4 75 4 75 

Michael Corbett, in aid of Henry Stearns. . . 5 00 5 00 
Wm. McClure, in aid of 40 tramps (bill of 

1885) 20 00 

Wm. McClure, in aid of 69 tramps 34 50 54 50 

Amount carried forward $1,509 08 



4 00 


4 00 


4 75 


4 75 


1 50 


1 50 



Amount brought forward $1,509 08 

Oeo. F. Snow, in aid of outside poor 

C. W. Flint, in aid of State paupers 

Amasa Howard, in aid of tramp 

Walter Winning, care Homer Thaver (bill of 

1885) " 9 38" 9 38 

A. H. Sheldon, funeral expense Geo. W. 

. LaDuc 17 00 

Dawson Pollard, burial expense Geo. W. 

LaDuc 4 00 

N. B. Edwards, medical aid Geo. W. LaDuc, 13 50 34 50 



11,563 21 



EXPENSES AT ALMSHOUSE. 



N. C. Bean, Superintendent $375 00 $375 00 

N. C. Bean, sundries 6 15 6 15 

Dutton Brothers, grain 238 33 238 33 

N. C. Bean, English hay, 3,175 lbs 31 85 

N. C Bean, meadow hay, 2,775 lbs 13 98 

J. M. Fletcher, meadow hay, 2,260 lbs 11 25 

Geo. Coburn, straw 1 00 58 08 

S. W. Parkhurst, groceries 290 54 290 54 

Erwin W. Sweetser, provisions 211 86 

B. Edwards, provisions 63 31 

J. H. Redman & Co., provisions 48 26 

Geo. F. Foss & Co., provisions 74 55 397 98 

F. Severance, crackers 27 70 27 70 

K C. Bean, apples 10 00 10 00 

H. S. Perham, 30 gals, vinegar 4 20 

John E. Stevens, vinegar 3 24 7 44 

C. A. Robinson, fish. 20 05 

J. T. Lock, fish 2 43 

Dutton Brothers, ice 14 76 

H. L. Parkhurst, 15,840 lbs. coal 45 54 

S. N. Wood, feed 2 50 

J. W. Cobb, soap 3 75 

O'Donnell & Gilbride, dry-goods 16 36 

Oswald & Co., dry-goods 3 40 

L. H. Boardman, shoes 3 75 

J. F. Puffer & Son, furniture 7 60 7 60 

D. C. Perham, 1 cow 49 00 

J. B. Kimball, 1 cow 38 00 87 00 

J. P. Emerson, 1 shoat 7 00 7 00 

Town Clerk, dog license 2 00 2 00 

Amasa Howard, medical attendance 24 25 

E. Preston, medical supplies 3 80 28 05 



22 


48 


14 


76 


45 


54 


2 


50 


3 


75 


19 


76 


3 


75 



Amount carried forward $1,655 41 



14 



Amount brought forward 

W. H. Spalding, painting and supplies 

Joseph Powell, whitewashing 

W. E. Livingston, cement 

Bartlett & Dow, tools 

John S. Shedd, tools , 

Aaron Sawyer, repairs of harness 

H. Snickle, repairs of harness 

David Polley, blacksmithing 

John Wozencroft, blacksmithing 

George French, labor 

Michael Ward, labor 

Frank Dalton, labor 

Hannah Kelley, labor 

D. W. Lane, labor 

John Keats, labor 

Geo. F. Wright, labor 

M. H. Vaugham, labor 

Estella Miller, labor . 

Peter J. Brennan, labor 

Hervey Thomas and others, labor. ... 

John Keats, care of Drake child 

R. W. Dix, services and expenses as Overseer, 

C. W. Flint, services and expenses as Overseer, 

H. S. Perham, services and expenses as Over- 
seer 

John Q. Battles, services and expenses as 
Overseer 

Geo. F. Snow, services and expenses as Over- 
seer 

Carried to account of highway, chopping and 
teaming; 17 cords fire wood 





$1,655 41 


9 17 


9 17 


5 00 


5 00 


1 35 


1 35 


16 06 




7 97 


24 03 


6 80 




1 75 


8 55 


20 10 




1 25 


21 35 


16 00 




8 00 




10 00 




85 00 




50 




1 25 




1 00 




1 00 




36 00 




37 27 




22 00 


218 02 


6 21 


6 21 


8 00 




28 75 




12 00 




5 00 




7 50 


61 25 


17 00 


17 00 



i,027 34 



Proceeds of Town Farm. 

Received for milk $560 28 

Received for cow 70 00 

Received for calves 5 75 

Received for swine 45 92 

Received for cranberries 23 00 

Received for sundries 8 20 

20,000 lbs. hay (estimated) used byroad horses, 

and charged to highways 200 00 

Board of men employed on highways, 216 

weeks, at 3.25 per week 702 00 

Total expense of poor at almshouse 



1,615 15 



$412 19 



15 



Paid for aid of outside poor $1,563 21 

Received on account of outside poor. 
From City of Boston, for aid rendered Mrs. 

Stillman Byam $43 25 

From Town of Billerica, aid rendered family 

of Henry Stearns 5 00 

From Matthias Hutchins, hospital bills 87 30 

From Henry S. Perharn, sail of trash wood. . 9 00 144 55 

Expense of outside poor $1,418 66 

Expense of poor at almshouse 412 19 

Total $1,830 85 

Inmates, 7 ; Females, 6 ; Males, 1 ; Tramps, 682. 

R. WILSON DIX, 
CHAS. W. FLINT, 
HENRY S. PERHAM, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Overseers. 



APPRAISAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMS- 
HOUSE, MARCH 1, 1887. 

Household furniture and bedding $331 47 

Provisions and supplies 278 36 

Farm implements 57 62 

3 hogs 32 00 

I cart 25 00 

Farm wagon 30 00 

II cords manure 55 00 

6 tons English hay 120 00 

Lot bedding 3 00 

3 tons meadow hay 30 00 

1 horse 100 00 

1 heavy harness 14 00 

1 square wagon 40 00 

Cart harness , 7 00 

6 cows 270 00 

1 sled 6 00 

1 pung . . 8 00 

Horse hay-rake 20 00 

Amount carried forward $1,427 45 



16 



Amount brought foricard. 

14 fowls 

1 Buffalo robe 

1 mowing machine 

1 Newfoundland dog 

1 side-hill plow 



11,427 


45 


7 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 


12 


00 



$1,486 45 

J. P. EMERSON, 
D. P. BYAM, 
ELISHA H. SHAW, 

Appraisers. 



HIGHWAYS. 

Dutton Bros., grain $221 67 $221 67 

S. W. Parkhurst, tools and supplies 26 08 

E. Shaw & Son, tools and supplies 5 38 31 46 

Bartlett & Dow, tools 16 00 16 00 

H. Hall, harness supplies 11 45 

H. F. Ebert, harness supplies 23 35 34 80 

David A. Polley, blacksmithing 77 08 

John Wozencroft, blacksmithing 59 36 

Durant & Son, blacksmithing 2 48 138 92 

James P. Emerson, 4,470 lbs. straw 26 82 26 82 

J. M. Fletcher, standing chestnut timber. ... 18 00 

A. L. Brooks & Co., lumber 9 51 27 51 

W. A. Josselyn, painting 46 guide boards. . . 23 00 

Eli P. Parker, repairing guide board 1 00 24 00 

Fiske & Spalding, paint. 8 19 8 19 

Warren Johnson^ building sleds 20 00 20 00 

John Marinel, Jr., labor 5 17 

John Dunn, labor 3 00 

Geo. F. Snow and others, labor 4 50 

Joseph P. Winn, labor 1 00 13 67 

Wm. Redmond, breaking roads 2 50 

A. Scoboria, breaking roads 1 50 

J. H. Hazen, breaking roads 3 00 

John J. Sullivan, breaking roads 3 00 

G. D. Smith & J. B. Coburn, breaking roads, 1 00 11 00 

Daniel P. Byam, breaking roads 3 00 

W. Z. Dupee. breaking roads 2 40 

Geo. P. Mansfield, breaking roads 2 00 7 40 

John Marinel & Co., stone chips 2 00 

E. F. Richardson, gravel, 252 loads 12 60 



Amounts carried forward $14 60 $581 44 



17 



Amounts brought forward 


$14 60 


$581 44 


John P. Crealin, gravel, 60 loads. ... 


6 


00 




Solomon Spauldina;, gravel, 102 loads 


8 


16 




S. S. Sleeper, gravel, 425 loads 


42 


40 




F. W. Blodgett, gravel, 120 loads 


9 


60 




Charles Sweetser, gravel, 100 loads 


5 


00 




B. P. Marshall, gravel, 135 loads 


6 
75 


75 
00 


92 51 


Lyman S. Gale, use of horse 60 days 




Highway pay-roll, March 


106 


95 




April 


154 


00 




May 


155 


05 




June 


156 


55 




July 


156 


70 




August . 


171 


20 




September 


195 


55 




October 


187 


80 




November 


192 


30 




December 


108 


30 






101 


30 




February 


97 


05 


1,782 25 








$2,531 20 


Carried to Account of Poor, for board, 216 








weeks, at $3.25 j)er week 


$702 


00 




Carried to Account of Poor 20,000 lbs. hay . . 


200 


00 


$902 00 




$3,433 20 


Less highway bills, chopping and hauling 17 








cords of wood 






17 00 







$3,416 20 
Highway pay-roll includes salary paid highway surveyor: $2.00 
per day for eight months, and $1.75 per day for four months. 

APPRAISAL OF HIGHWAY TEAMS AND TOOLS, 
MARCH 1, 1887. 

4 horses $550 00 

2 2-horse sleds (new) 90 00 

3 2-horse carts 150 00 

1 drag 4 00 

1 jigger 50 00 

1 Kimball road-scraper 160 00 

2 road-scrapers 13 00 

2 road-scrapers (old) 1 50 

1 plow 5 00 

Amount carried forward $1,023 50 

2 



18 



Amount brought forward . . 

Evener and whiffletrees 

Cart spear and rocker 

Wagon pole and shafts 

2 sets double harness 

8 shovels 

8 picks 

4 grab-hoes 

7 stone hammers , 

3 axes, 2 bush hooks 

Hames and chains 

6 large wedges 

Drill and wedges 

Feed trough , 

4 halters 

Old junk 

Grain 

Chestnut fence poles , 

Plank 

3 large chains 

Pail and jug 

3 lanterns 

Brushes, wrenches, and sponges, 

Pole straps and reins 

2 hoes 

2 stone-pickers 

1 large saw 

Feed-bags and horse-blankets . . 

Iron bars and steel rakes 

Scythes and snaths 



£1,023 


50 


10 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


70 


00 


5 


60 


8 


00 


4 00 


7 


00 


5 


00 


3 


50 


2 


00 


16 


00 


1 


50 


1 


75 


1 


00 


7 


70 


10 


00 


10 


00 


3 


50 




75 


1 


50 


5 


00 


1 


50 




90 


2 


00 


2 


00 


8 


50 


8 


00 


3 


50 



L,231 70 



J. P. EMEKSON, 
D. P. BYAM, 
ELISHA H. SHAW, 

Appraisers. 



EEPAIBS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Geo. E. Spaulding, repairing Town Hall at 

North Chelmsford $39 21 

A. J. Lamphere, repairing Town Hall at 

Centre 4 12 

G. H. Johnson, repairing Town Hall at 

Centre 6 50 

A. G. Green, shingling school-house No. 1 . . . 61 00 

Amount carried forward 



39 21 



10 62 
61 00 



5110 83 



19 



Amount brought forward $110 88 

A. B. Chapman, painting school-house No. 6, $38 00 

T. S. Edmands, repairing fence at school- 
house No. 6 

A. L. Brooks & Co., lumber for fence No. 8, 

Silver & Gay, lumber for fence No. 8 ...... . 

James B. Coburn, labor on fence No. 8 

Chas. W. Flint, labor on fence No. 8 

John Q. Battles, repairing horse-sheds at 
Centre 

$198 73 

STATE AID. 

Paid under chapter 301, statutes of 1879. . . $427 00 $427 00 
Paid under chapter 252, statutes of 1879 121 00 121 00 



25 


38 25 


!7 28 




1 77 




1 00 




4 00 


44 05 


5 60 


5 60 



$548 00 



COLLECTION AND ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Geo. F. Snow, abatement of taxes 1884 $41 23 

Geo. F. Snow, collecting $116.46 tax of 1884, 1 22 

A. H. Sheldon, abatement of taxes 1885 90 08 

A. H. Sheldon, abatement of taxes 1886 62 57 

A. H. Sheldon, collecting $553.48 tax of 

1885, at .017 9 41 

A. H. Sheldon, collecting $24.39 interest 1885, 41 
A. H. Sheldon, collecting $16,107.91 tax of 

1886, at .014 225 51 

A. H.Sheldon, collecting $113.90 interest 1886, 1 59 



WELL AT SOUTH CHELMSFORD. 

Warren Berry and N. E. Parker, labor 

W. E. Livingston, brick and cement 

Allen Smith, teaming brick and cement. . . . 

J. Q. Battles, labor and stock 

Bartlett & Dow, pump and tubing 



INSURANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

E. M. Tucke $144 00 

H. C. Church & Son 156 00 



$25 


00 


11 


20 


2 


20 


6 


22 


5 


82 



$432 02 



$50 44 



$300 00 



20 



ENFORCEMENT OF LIQUOR LAW. 

Alfred Day, services 143 50 

Attorney fees 5 00 

Assistance 5 25 



$53 75 



ENLARGING SCHOOL-HOUSE NO. 1. 

A. G. Green, labor and materials $1,857 00 

Harry L. Green, freight 3 45 

A. G. Green, repairs and setting seats and 

desks 44 06 

Jona. Larcom, plans and specifications 25 00 

H. H. Wilder & Co., furnaces 375 00 

Michigan School Furniture Co., furniture. . . . 156 46 

H. L. Parkhurst, freight 54 

A. B. Chapman, finishing and varnishing 

desks 25 25 

A. H. Sheldon, services as committee 3 00 



FIRE APPARATUS. 

Bishop & Brothers, ladders $71 08 

C. B. Coburn & Co., 10 doz. fire-pails 30 00 

C. B. Coburn & Co., paints 3 00 

C. B. Coburn & Co., 87 lbs. rope 10 44 

A. L. Brooks & Co., lumber for ladder-houses, 74 78 

Geo. F. Snow, lumber for ladder-houses 3 00 

Bartlett & Dow, hardware 10 46 

T. M. Gerrish, hardware 2 85 

S. W. Parkhurst, hardware 30 

E. Shaw & Son, hardware 181 15 42 

D. Pollard, 5 days' labor 7 50 

Geo. F. Snow, 4 days' labor 6 00 

N. E. Parker, labor 12 00 

J. Q. Battles, labor 10 80 

Charles Dane, painting ladder-house at West 

Chelmsford 2 00 

A. J. Lamjmere, painting ladders 11 90 

R. W. Dix, teaming and painting ladders. ... 4 00 

W. R. Wining, teaming 1 25 

C. H. Dutton, drilling stone posts 1 00 

Old Colony R. R., freight 75 

Boston & Lowell R. R., freight 1 17 

A. Grover, stencils 1 05 

Geo. F. Snow, time and expense procuring 

fire apparatus 5 00 

$272 14 



1,489 


76 


$71 


08 


43 


44 


77 


78 



36 


30 


2 


00 


17 
1 


15 
00 


1 
1 


92 

05 


5 


00 



21 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 



Vox Populi Press, order book 

Vox Populi Press, printing 600 town and 

school reports 

Vox Populi Press, printing license ballots. . . 
Geo. A. Parkhurst, copy Herrick's Town 

Officer 

John Keats, railing around pump at Centre. . 
John Wozencroft, railing round pump at 

Centre 

C. W. Flint, repairing tomb at No. Chelms- 
ford 

Luther B. Hall, supper for Lowell firemen. .. 
Sargent & Gay, printing assessors' notices. . . 
Win. H. Brown, painting cemetery fence at 

West Chelmsford 

True Morton, set of sealers' weights and 

measures 

Littlefield & Pease, boxes for filing town 

papers 

E. Dutton, work in cemetery at No. Chelms- 
ford " 

John Knowles, work in cemetery at North 

Chelmsford 

A. H. Sheldon, work in cemetery at North 

Chelmsford 

L. K. Howard, labor and material in Centre 

cemetery 

Geo. F. Snow, labor in West Chelmsford 

cemetery . 

Daniel P. Byam, labor in South Chelmsford 

cemetery 

Daniel P. Byam, reporting 7 deaths 

A. H. Sheldon, reporting 10 deaths 

Dawson Pollard, reporting 3 deaths 

Henry Warclel, legal advice in Litchfield & 

Wilkins case 

Town clerk, dog-license book. 

Sargent & Gay, 950 bill heads 

Marden & Rowell, 100 pay-roll blanks 

Little, Brown & Co., copy of Potter's Road 

and Roadside 

A. H. Sheldon, taxes 

S. W. Parkhurst, lamp-fixture for Centre hall, 

C. H. McKinney, ^ doz. burners 

C. H. McKinney, 8 doz. chimneys 

Amounts carried forward 



$ 5 00 



56 20 




2 25 


$63 45 


2 50 


2 50 


2 00 


2 00 


4 61 


4 61 


2 00 


2 00 


6 00 


6 00 


2 50 


2 50 


67 50 


67 50 


22 50 


22 3D 


2 88 


2 88 


5 25 




5 00 




1 50 


11 75 


17 90 


17 90 


4 00 


4 00 


10 94 


10 94 


1 75 




2 50 




75 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 25 


1 25 


3 00 


3 00 


2 50 


2 50 


1 00 


1 00 


56 00 


56 00 


50 




1 50 




6 60 





$8 60 1294 28 



22 



Amounts brought forward 

C. H. McKinney, repairing chandelier 

D. A. Polley, repairing chandelier 

H. B. Shattuck, 2 locks 

John Higgins, labor on well 

French & Puffer, lamp for armory at North 

Chelmsford 

H. H. Wilder, furnace grate, Centre 

A. J. Lamphere, care of Centre hall 

Geo. E. Spaulding, care lighting and warming 
hall and armory for Co. F, cavalry, at 
North Chelmsford 

N. B. Edwards, reporting births 

Geo. F. Snow, precinct bounds 

Peter J. Brennan, damage on highway 



; 8 60 


$294 28 


6 75 




2 00 


17 35 


1 00 


1 00 


1 10 


1 10 


1 75 


1 75 


3 50 


3 50 


10 70 


10 70 


34 50 


34 50 


3 00 


3 00 


1 50 


1 50 


8 00 


8 00 



76 68 



TOWN OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES. 



Paid E. II. Warren, services as town treasurer, 

E. H. Warren, expense as town treasurer, 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, services and expenses 
as town clerk 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, services and expenses 
as registrar 

E. D. Bearce, services as registrar Sep- 
tember, 1884, to August, 1886 

L. M. Dutton, services as registrar 

J. H. Vincent, services as registrar 

II. S. Perham, services as selectman .... 

H. S. Perham, expenses as selectman . . . 

Chas. W. Flint, services as selectman. . . 

Chas. W. Flint, expenses as selectman. . 

J. Q. Battles, services as selectman 

J. Q. Battles, expenses as selectman .... 

R. Wilson Dix, services as selectman . . . 

R. Wilson Dix, expenses as selectman. . 

Geo. F. Snow, services as selectman .... 

Geo. F. Snow, expenses as selectman .... 

Chas. W. Flint, services as assessor 

Chas. W. Elint, expenses as assessor. . . . 

Chas. W. Flint, copying valuation list 
for use of state 

H. S. Perham, services as assessor 

H. S. Perham, expenses as assessor 

Amount carried forward 



$50 00 




12 50 


$ 62 50 


57 89 


57 89 


17 71 




15 00 




10 50 




1 50 


44 71 


70 00 




9 40 


79 40 


66 00 




24 35 


90 35 


35 00 




20 00 


55 00 


48 00 




10 00 


58 00 


35 00 




15 00 


50 00 


93 00 




12 85 




20 00 


125 85 


38 00 




2 25 


40 25 



$663 95 



23 



Amount brought forward 1663 95 

Paid R. Wilson Dix, services as assessor. . . . 

R. Wilson Dix, expenses as assessor. . . 

J. Q. Battles, services as assessor 

J. Q. Battles, expenses as assessor 

Geo. F. Snow, services as assessor 

Geo. F. Snow, expenses as assessor 

Chas. W. Flint, labor and expense on 
precinct bounds 

Alfred Day, enforcing dog law 

James P. Emerson, posting warrants. . . 

James P. Emerson, notifying 14 town 

officers 4 20 

James P. Emerson, traveling fees, 14 
town officers 

James P. Emerson, services as constable, 

J. II. Whidden, services as constable. . . 

E. H. Shaw, James P. Emerson, and 
Daniel P. Byam, services as apprais- 
ers 8 00 8 00 

Ziba Gay, E. F. Richardson, and J. 

Adams Bartlett, auditing committee, 8 00 8 00 

$829 79 



;29 00 




8 00 


37 00 


25 00 




5 00 


30 00 


21 00 




9 00 


30 00 


2 64 


2 64 


16 80 


16 80 


8 00 





2 50 




3 70 


18 40 


15 00 


15 00 



24 



AGGREGATE OF APPROPRIATIONS, RECEIPTS, AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Schools, appropriation . . . . 

School fund 

Dog tax 

Tuition from non-resident 

pupils 

Teaching 

Care of houses . . . . 
Fuel 

School incidentals 

Free text-books, appropriation . . 

Free text-books, receipts .... 

Support of poor, appropriation 

Support of poor, receipts .... 

Highway, appropriation .... 

State aid, receipts 

Repairs public buildings, approp'n, 

Relief of indigent soldiers and sail- 
ors, appropriation 

Relief of indigent soldiers and sail- 
ors, receipts 

Town officers and committees, ap- 
propriation 

Collection and abatement of taxes, 
appropriation 

Miscellaneous expenses, approp'n, 

Miscellaneous expenses, receipts, 

Enlargement of school-house at 
Centre, appropriation .... 

Enforcement of the liquor law, ap- 
propriation 

Re-insurance of public buildings, 
appropriation 

Well and pump at So. Chelmsford, 
appropriation 

Fire apparatus, appropriation . . 

Road at W. Chelmsford, appropri'n, 



Appro- 
priations. 



$5,000 00 
179 54 
357 48 

56 05 



450 00 

400 00 

39 79 

2,300 00 

857 70 

3,500 00 

443 00 

350 00 

100 00 

72 00 

750 00 

400 00| 

250 00 1 

210 90. 

2,500 00 

400 00, 

300 Oo! 

75 00 

600 00 

400 00 



$19,991 46 



Expendi- 
tures. 



t,871 45 

271 05 

416 27 

356 60 

680 97 



2,688 55 

3,416 20 

427 00 

198 73 



121 00 

829 79 

432 02 
376 68 

2,489 76 

53 75 

300 00 

50 44 
272 14 



Excess. 



$18,252 40 
1,739 06 



$19,991 46 $19,991 46 



$34 30 
93 40 



469 15 
83 80 
16 00 

151 27 



51 00 



84 22 

10 24 

346 25 



24 56 
327 86 

400 00 



$2,092 05 



Defi- 
ciency. 



$241 18 



79 79 
32 02 



$ 352 99 
1,739 06 



092 05 $2,092 05 



Appropriations 
Receipts . . 



517,775 00 Amount of Orders 
2,216 46 i Surplus . . . . 



$19,991 46 



$18,252 40 
1,739 06 

$19,991 46 



HENRY S. PERHAM, 
CIIAS. W. FLINT, 
R. WILSON DIX, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Selectmen. 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



Having examined the account of the treasurer for the year ending 
Feb. 28, 1887, we find his receipts and payments properly entered 
and vouched, and a balance of eleven hundred and seventy dollars 
and sixteen cents ($1,170.16) in his hands. 

We find bills and receipts in the hands of the selectmen amount- 
ing to eighteen thousand two hundred and fifty-two dollars and 
forty cents (118,252.40), vouchers for orders drawn on the treasurer 
and paid by him. 

We find — 

Cash in treasury $1,170 16 

Tax of 1885, uncollected $ 17 84 

Interest on tax, 1885 1 76 

Tax of 1886, uncollected 1,033 29 

Interest on tax, 1886 30 64 1,083 53 

School books and supplies 125 00 

Due from the State — 

For State Aid to Jan. 1, 1887 $397 00 

State Aid for January and February, 

1887 62 00 

Relief to Jan. 1, 1887 78 50 

Relief for January and February, 1887. . 14 00 

Armory rent 150 00 701 50 

$3,080 19 

Kimball Fund $100 00 

Interest on Kimball Fund 22 64 

Silver Fund 100 00 

Interest on Silver Fund 8 00 

Estimated liabilities 100 00 

Estimated abatements 50 00 $380 64 

Assets over liabilities $2,699 55 



Chelmsford, March 3, 1887. 



ZIBA GAY, 

E. F. RICHARDSON, 

J. ADAMS BARTLETT, 

Auditing Committee. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



List of scales in Chelmsford sealed during the year ending Feb. 

28,1887: — 

T. M. Gerrish, South Chelmsford : 1 hay scale, 1 portable platform, 
1 grocer, 1 even balance. 

D. W. Bickford, South Chelmsford : 1 portable platform, 1 Union, 

1 even balance. 
S. W. Parkhurst, Chelmsford Centre: 1 hay, 1 portable platform, 1 
grocer, 1 counter, 1 druggist's counter, 1 butter, 1 even balance. 

E. Netel, Chelmsford Centre: 1 counter, 1 even balance. 

E. W. Sweetser, Chelmsford Centre: 1 portable platform, 1 Buffalo 

market. 
Dutton Bros., Chelmsford Centre : 2 portable platform, 1 dormant 

platform. 
H. S. Perham, Chelmsford Centre: 1 Union. 
J. M. Butman, Chelmsford Centre: 1 portable platform. 
Silver & Gay, North Chelmsford: 2 portable platform, 1 even 

balance. 
Chelmsford Foundry Co., North Chelmsford : 1 R. R. track, 1 

dormant platform. 
George Moore, North Chelmsford: 3 dormant platform. 1 portable 

platform. 
E. Shaw & Son, North Chelmsford : 1 hay, 1 portable platform, 1 

grocer, 1 even balance; ordered for repairs, 1 portable platform. 
G. W. Perry, West Chelmsford : 1 hay, 1 portable platform, 1 

grocer, 1 even balance. 
M. H. Winship, West Chelmsford: 3 scales not sealed. 

TRUE MORTON, 

Sealer. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Chelmsford in said 
County, GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby 
required to notify the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet at 
the Town Hall, at Chelmsford Centre, on Monday, the twenty-first 
day of March current, being the third Monday in said month, at 
nine o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act on the following 
articles, viz. : — 

Article 1. To choose a moderator. 

Art. 2. To hear reports of town officers aucl committees, and act thereon. 
To determine the manner of collecting the taxes. 
To determine the manner of repairing the highways, townways, 

and bridges. 
To choose all necessary town officers. 

To act in relation to the list of jurors prepared by the selectmen. 
To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be necessary 
to defray town charges for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will authorize the treasurer to borrow such 
sums of money as may be required for the payment of the de- 
mands upon him in anticipation of the taxes of the ensuing year, 
and payable therefrom. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to grant licenses for the sale of in- 
toxicating liquors for the current year. 

Art. 10. At the request of N. B. Edwards and others, to see if the town 
will vote to enlarge the burying ground at North Chelmsford, or 
purchase land for a new ground, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 11. At the request of Israel Putnam, Perley P. Perham, E K. Park- 
hurst, Geo. O. Byam, and twenty-three ( 23 ) othei's, to see if 
the town will vote to exempt from taxation for a term of years 
all the machinery, buildings, real estate, and all other property 
owned by any individual or firm, who shall within one year es- 
tablish in this town some manufacturing industry, employing 
not less than twenty-flve hands; provided that such exemption 
shall apply only to property used for manufacturing purposes, 
and that such enterprise shall be approved by the board of 
selectmen. 



Art. 


3. 


Art. 


4. 


Art. 


5. 


Art. 


6. 


Art. 


7. 



28 



Art. 12. At the request of T. S. Eclmands, James McFarlin, Geo. F. Dyar, 
and others, to see if the town w;ll vote to dig a well at the 
school-house at East Chelmsford, put a pump in the same, and 
make an appropriation therefor, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 13. At the request of Geo. E. Spalding, Hubert Bearce, C. R. 
Sprague, and others, to see if the town will vote to appropriate 
money for a cistern and pump at the town hall at North Chelms- 
ford, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 14. At the request of Edwin H. Warren, to see if ths town will vote 
to appropriate a sum of money to be expended in the care and 
improvements of the cemeteries, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to authorize the selectmen to pro- 
cure a survey and plau of the town wood-lots, and appropriate 
money for same, or act in relation thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant, by posting up attested 
copies thereof at the Post-Offices in the Centre of the town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chelmsford, and at the School- 
ho'use at East Chelmsford, ten days at least before the time ap- 
pointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this warrant, with your do- 
ings thereon, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this tenth day of March, in the year of 
our Lord eighteen hundred and eighty-seven. 

HENRY S. PERHAM, 
JOHN Q. BATTEES, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



I have served the foregoing Warrant, by posting up true and 
attested copies of the same at the places above mentioned, more 
than ten days before the day of holding said meeting. 

ALFRED DAY, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Town of Chelmsford 



( MASSACHUSETTS), 



Year Ending Feb. 28, 1887. 



LOWELL, MASS.: 
VOX POPULI PRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1887. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



As required by law your School Committee render the 
following report : A new organization of the Board was 
necessary by reason of new members being elected to fill 
places made vacant by the expiration of the terms of 
three members. 

As re-organized Rev. J. H. Vincent was re-elected super- 
intendent ; J. C. Hobbs, chairman, and Rev. N. C. Saun- 
ders, secretary. 

We do not propose to enter into any lengthy detail re- 
port cf school matters, leaving that to follow from the 
hand of our more competent Superintendent, whose report 
will be complete in all its details. 

It is a pleasure to your Committee to know and feel 
that each member of the Board has at heart his du- 
ties as committee of his particular school or schools, 
doing all in his power to promote the interests of scholars 
and teachers, and endeavoring to excel in its work over 
the preceding year. 

This is as it should be ; and seeing that suitable 
teachers are procured and their positions made pleasant is 
our first duty, and in doing this we may retain them long 
enough to make it more profitable for our schools ; for we 
believe, as our predecessors, that it is poor policy to 
change teachers too often, although necessity compels us 



to make changes sometimes, but we hope always for the 
best interests of all concerned. Furthermore we would 
say that while we know our schools are not perfect and 
up to that standard which is possible, we do feel that we 
have by no means lost ground over preceding years. 

We hope the citizens of Chelmsford will bear in mind 
that our schools are growing more and more important 
every year, new schools and higher grades of teachers 
being required to fill the needs of our growing population. 

As this will require a larger appropriation for school 
purposes, we know you will see the necessity of giving 
such sums as will allow your Committee to carry out the 
school work, feeling that with proper care and economy 
we may yet have, and keep, the best grade of teachers 
possible for our schools. By doing this we shall be 
enabled to give you schools that will do honor to our 
citizens, and an education to our children that will do 
credit to our school system. 

Trusting the report of your Superintendent and Com- 
mittee for the past year will meet with your approbation, 
we are 

Very respectfully, 

J. C. HOBBS, Chairman, 

S. J. GARLAND, 

J. H. HAZEN, 

E. E. DUTTON, 

T. S. EDMANDS, 

GEO. F. LOCKE, 

R. S. RIPLEY, 

M. H. WINSHIP, 

N. C. SAUNDERS, Secretary, 

School Committee. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the School Committee of the Town of Chelmsford : 

Gentlemen, — In making the report of this my fifth 
year's service as Superintendent of the schools of the 
town, I have to say that my work the past year has 
been much the same as in other years. 

When the schools have opened, I have tried to visit 
them as soon as possible, so as to assist in organizing and 
to find out what books and supplies were needed. 

When new teachers have taken charge of the schools I 
have usually suggested that they begin in the books 
where the former teachers left the classes ; to do only 
as much talking themselves as will aid and not confuse 
the minds of the scholars ; to teach the scholars to recite 
their lessons without being prompted ; to put all the work they 
can on the blackboards so that the eye might aid the mind and 
memory ; to keep the scholars advancing slowly and thor- 
oughly, so that they might not become tired of their lessons ; 
to follow the order of the subjects as laid down in the books, so 
that visitors could see progress, and not have to accept it by 
faith ; to visit the schools again in a few days, to notice if there 
were defects in the methods of instruction, and suggest im- 
provements, if needed. So you can see gentlemen, that the 
Superintendent's position is a delicate one, and yet it is a work 
that must not be neglected if the scholars are to receive the 
full benefit of the money appropriated by the town. Many 
young teachers beginning the work of teaching have no defi- 
nite plans of instruction, and the Superintendent can be of great 
advantage to them in saving them from comparative failure in 



6 



their work. And my suggestions in most cases have been 

kindly received, and in some thankfully. 

THE HOP-SKIP METHOD IN READING. 

I have advised teachers to begin and continue in the reading 
books, as they would read a book themselves, not to skip 
around except in review. In the skip method, one piece is 
read perhaps a dozen times, while others are read only once, or 
are entirely neglected ; and by this method the scholars do not 
know when they are through with the book. Neither are 
such good results obtained by the skip method, nor so rapid 
progress made. 

SUBORDINATE TEXT-BOOKS. 

Once in a while. I have found a teacher who makes text- 
books subordinate, which I think is a relic of inefficiency ; that 
is, they do not require the scholars to follow the text-books, 
and where this is done, in my judgment, the schools are subordi- 
nate in the work done ; and after going from a school where 
text-books were followed strictly, into a school where they 
were not, it has made me feel sad when I saw evidence, as 
I thought, that the time of the scholars comparatively was being 
wasted. In these cases the teachers try to crowd so much in 
general upon the scholars, that they learn comparatively noth- 
ing in particular; also, it encourages lack of attendance, for in 
this way a scholar can stay out two or three days a week and 
be as far advanced as those who attend regularly, or they 
think so. 

SPELLING THE WORDS WHEN READING. 

This is another relic of inefficiency which has almost been 
abolished in our schools, as far as I have observed. In stop- 
ping to spell a word, the scholar loses the sense of the piece 
read, and also interest in reading ; the better way, I think, is to 
let the scholars spell the more difficult words before reading, 
and for the smaller scholars to put the words on the black- 
board. 



BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

The past year it has cost the town about $1.14 a person, 
using books and supplies, including the teachers, who have 
to be supplied with desk-books. When it is remembered that 
it costs the town from $5.00 to $7.00, to furnish a High-school 
scholar, and that Chelmsford has two High schools, and that 
we have had scholars in High-school studies in five other 
schools during the year, and that it costs about $4.00 to furnish 
a Grammar-school scholar, about $2.50 to furnish an Inter- 
mediate scholar, and that it has taken three years to get a sup- 
ply of books in the school, — I think no reasonable person will 
complain of the cost ; and of course it ought not to cost so 
much in the future as in the past three years, but it should be 
remembered that writing-books, drawing-books, examination- 
paper, book-keeping blanks, pens, pencils, etc., can not be 
handed down to other scholars. 

The following is a brief outline of the condition of the 
schools, the past year. 

The statistics and wages of the teachers may be found at 
the close of the school report. 

No. 1. — The Centre of the Town. 

Grammar and High School. — The spring term of the 
school was in charge of Mr. A. F. Gilbert, as principal, and 
Miss E. L. Pierce, as assistant. The order was good, scholars 
did good work, and progress was noticeable 

During the summer vacation the school house was enlarged, 
and in the fall term the school was divided, Mr. Gilbert taking 
the High-school department, and Miss Ada M. Sheldon the 
Grammar. The beginning of the winter term there being an 
increase of scholars, the third room for this school was opened, 
— Miss Sheldon taking the Intermediate ; Miss May Rey 
Hodsdon the Grammar, and Mr. Gilbert the High-school 
department. The schools not being large, and the teachers 
having sufficient time, the scholars were given a thorough drill 
in their studies ; order in all the schools was good. 



No. r. — PRIMARY. 

Miss N. M. Perham was in charge of this school through 
the year. Some new methods to interest the scholars were 
noticed. The examination at the close of the spring term 
showed that there were some very bright scholars in the school, 
and that they could tell those present what they knew. 

No. 2.— MIXED. North Row. 

During the year here we had more than the usual number of 
changes. Miss Helen Gookin, of Lowell, began the year, and 
took hold of her work with great interest ; her scholars, also, 
took hold of their work with great interest, and after teaching 
the spring term and four weeks of the fall, she resigned, to ac- 
cept a position in the schools of Lowell. Miss S. Eva Worthen, 
of Chelmsford, then took charge, keeping the scholars inter- 
ested and at work. After teaching five weeks, on account of 
sickness, she also resigned. The winter term was taught by 
Miss Blanche E. Henshaw, of Lowell, who is a graduate of 
Framingham Normal School. Miss Henshaw's work was very 
thorough and progressive, and her school a good success. 

No. 3. — MIXED. South Chelmsford. 

The same teacher taught here as for the past three years 
— Miss A. V. Paasche. Miss Paasche is one of our most thor- 
oughly educated teachers ; self-reliant, knows how, after the 
class has recited its lesson from the book, to give examples and 
lessons that will help the scholars to understand and remember 
the lessons studied. The examination at the close of the year 
was very satisfactory. Composition writing received careful 
attention, as well as all other studies. The scholars are well 
advanced in this school. 

No. 4.— MIXED. South Row. 

The same teacher, Miss Gertrude W. Byam, was in charge 
here through the year. Progress was noticeable in this school, 
and that was the testimony of those present at the examination 
who have known the school for years. One remarked how 



9 



bright and far advanced the little folks are. Scholars here, also 
in High-school studies, seemed to have grasped the subjects gone 
over, and recited with an ease and interest in their studies not 
often seen even in High schools. 

No. 5. — MIXED. Esquire Byam's Neighborhood. 

The spring term here was taught by Miss Ida E. Byam ; but 
on account of the sickness of Miss Byam, the fall term was 
taught by Miss Lydia Hey wood, of New Ipswich, N. H., who 
found, as she said, the school in good condition, the scholars 
bright, wide awake, and interested in their work ; and she kept 
them in the same condition in which she found them. The 
winter term Miss Byam took charge again, and did even better 
work than in the spring. Her class of eleven-year-old scholars, 
in intellectual arithmetic, are certainly equal to any, I think, I 
ever saw; also the same scholars in the Fourth Supplementary 
Readers. The scholars here are advanced gradually and thor- 
oughly, and understand their work about as well as it is possible 
for little folks to understand it. 

No. 6. — MIXED. East Chelmsford. 

Miss Susie M. McFarlin was the teacher in this school 
through the year, and progress was always noticeable. Fluency 
in reading is cultivated, arithmetic seemed to be well under- 
stood, writing-books were neat and free from ink-blots, and 
scholars well advanced in'writing; so that the scholars have a 
chance to get a good foundation for an education under Miss 
McFarlin's skilful teaching. 

No. 7. — MIXED. Spalding's Neighborhood. 

Miss G. Etta Locke taught the spring and fall terms. Her 
scholars always appeared to be interested in their work, and 
Progress was her motto. She resigned at the close of the fall 
term, and Miss Mary L. Keith, of North Chelmsford, was se- 
cured to take her place, who took hold of her work with energy 
and enthusiasm, and succeeded in doing a good term's work 
with both large and small scholars. 



10 



No. 8. — North Chelmsford. 



High School. — The teacher in this school, the spring and fall 
terms, was Mr. Geo. F. Partridge, of Caryville, a graduate of 
Harvard college. Mr. Partridge took hold with a determination 
to make his school a success, which he did, doing better and 
better work as the weeks went by, growing in favor with the 
scholars, parents, and friends of the school ; and it was to the 
great regret of all that he resigned at the close of the fall term, 
to accept a position as teacher in Boston. At the commence- 
ment of the winter term, Mr. V. B. Wells took charge, and 
after teaching seven weeks, on account of ill-health, not having 
as much energy to give to the school as it required, he resigned, 
and Mr. W. F. Parsons, of Lowell, took the school and carried 
it through very successfully. By these changes I do not think 
the scholars lost much, as each teacher took up the work where 
the other left it, each having a daily programme of exercises on 
the desk, — a practice that ought to become universal, I think, 
in the schools. 

Grammar School. — North Chelmsford Grammar school has 
been very fortunate in having the same efficient teacher in this 
school the past four years — Miss Addie M. Taylor. The work 
in this school is marked by promptness, thoroughness, and pride, 
on the part of the scholars, in. doing their work well. The ex- 
amination at the close of the fall term was excellent, and gave 
great pleasure to the large number of visitors present. The 
remark was, by those who have known the school for years, 
that great advancement was noticeable in this school. 

Intermediate School. — Miss Minnie E. Worden taught the 
spring term with her well-known skill, but resigned at its close 
to accept a position in Marlborough, and was succeeded by 
Miss Hattie A. Burgess, of Worcester, who kept her scholars 
interested and making progress. The winter term she was 
succeeded by Miss Kate Sleeper, who kept her scholars wide- 
awake and doing good work. Miss Sleeper's methods of in- 
struction are such as to excite the ambition of her scholars, 
and each tries to excel the other. 

Primary School. -^-Miss Laura G. Hoyt's work in this school 
is still a matter of pride to the parents of the children, 



11 



whose confidence Miss Hoyt has. Miss Hoyt takes pains 
with the slow scholars, and encourages them, until slow 
and quick start off together in classes. The examination at 
the close of the fall term was very enjoyable to the large num- 
ber present. Composition-writing by the little folks is at- 
tended to, and everything done well. 

No. 9. — West Chelmsford. 

Grammar School. — Miss Carrie E. Robbins was the efficient 
teacher in this school the past year. Miss Robbins is certainly 
one of our best teachers. A thorough scholar herself, she aims 
to make her scholars the same. There is no need of repeating 
the work she takes her scholars through. When the classes 
were called out on examination day, she showed the Superin- 
tendent the work the classes had been over, and gave him the 
privilege to choose any part they had been over, and the schol- 
ars certainly acquitted themselves well. 

Primary School. — The same teacher, Miss Agnes Naylor, 
and the same good work has been done the past year in this 
school as in other years. Miss Naylor has a remarkable faculty 
for interesting little folks, and of helping them understand 
their work, and of helping them think on their feet. The 
usual excellent examination, and the same large number of vis- 
itors were present at Miss Naylor's annual examination. This 
should be said for West Chelmsford people : that they turn out 
in large numbers at their school examinations, which of course 
is a source of encouragement to the teachers. 

Now, I have said only a part of the good things that might 
be said of teachers and schools, but space forbids my saying 
more. And from this brief survey, some may say that I think 
the schools are perfect ; but no one knows better than the 
Superintendent that they are not. But allowing for the imper- 
fections that belong to all thin gs human, I can conscientiously 
say that in most of the schools — not in all — the work has been 
about what ought to be expected, taking the health and physi- 
cal growth of the scholars into consideration ; for in most of 
the schools sterling work has been done. And if some teachers 



12 



had followed the suggestions made by the Superintendent, in- 
stead of finding fault with them, their work would have been 
more gratifying to themselves, as well as more pleasing to the 
parents of the scholars, judging by the work done by those 
teachers who have always been ready to receive suggestions. 

Our schools are now, gentlemen, in such a state of advance- 
ment that great care should be exercised in the selection of 
teachers well qualified to teach ; for in our district schools we 
need teachers who can teach High-school studies. 

I close this report thanking you, gentlemen, for having en- 
trusted me with the schools the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. VINCENT, 

Superin tenden t . 



ROLL OF HONOR -PUPILS NOT ABSENT. 

Those marked * were tardy. 



HIGH SCHOOL No. 1. 

The Year — Alvan R. Saunders. 
Two Teems — Wm. Fletcher, Ena Bickford. 
One Term — Arthur M. Warren,* Emile Paignon,* Louise 
Reed,* Edith Emerson * 

GRAMMAR No. 1. 

The Year — James Emerson,* Clara Hutchinson.* 

Two Terms — Ernest Mansfield, Dannie Haley, Harry Merrill, 

Annie Curtin. 

One Term — Grace Hallett, Stephen Mooney, Eugenie Paignon, 

Bertha Parkhurst, Grace Mansfield. 

INTERMEDIATE No. 1. 

Two Terms — Cora Hutchinson, Sadie Thurlow, John Haley. 
One Term — Edward M. Parkhurst, Jessie Holt, Alice Paignon, 
Ralph Emerson. 

PRIMARY No. 1. 

Two Terms — Estelle Hutchinson, Harold Davis, Hawthorne 
Howard. 

One Term — Cora Hutchinson, Louise Wiggin, Herbert Whit- 
ney, Timmy Curtin, Leslie Davis, Leon Thurlow, Harry Ward, Lulu 
Parkhurst. 

MIXED No. 2. 

Two Terns— Gertie Fulton, Willie Fulton. 
One Term — Gertie Hall, Bridget Driscoll, Willie Fowle, 
Tommy Sheehan. 



14 



MIXED No. 3. 

The Year — Grace Garland, Lyman Byam, Nettie Byam. 

Two Terms — Arthur Smith, Maggie Sloan. 

One Term — Fred Park, Emma Parker, Mabel Pickard. 

MIXED No. 4. 

Two Terms — Ida E. Melvin. 

One Term — Inez A. Davis, Florence Cummings, Merton Cum- 
mings, Eddie J. Robbins. 

MIXED No. 5. 

The Year — Stella M. Byam, Charles H. Dutton, Harry A. 
Dutton. 

Two Terms — Bertha A. Eowell, Arthur E. Dutton, Walter E. 
Newhall, Clara E. Newhall. 

MIXED No. 6. 

The Year — Bertha Teabo. 

One Term — Walter Devine, Ernest Bartlett, Mary Devine, 
Bella Sharp, Jane Finnick. 

MIXED No. 7. 

The Year — Elsie L. Hodson, Frank E. Martin. 
Two Terms — Ella Hodson, Oscar Hodson, Guy E. Reed, Willie 
Martin. 

One Term — Michael Donelley,* Almeda Reed. 

HIGH No. 8. 

The Year — Royal C. Reed, Belle E. Smith. 

Two Terms — Daisy E. Ripley. 

One Term — Jennie R. R. Brown, Martha Hall, Clara A. Wright, 
Nellie L. Perham, Bertha A. Swain, Henry E. Davis, James Con- 
nor, George B. Perham, Ralph L. Ripley, James A. Sawyer, Walter 
E. Swain. 

GRAMMAR No. 8. 

Two Terms — Amelia B. Marinel, Blanche L. Sampson, Fannie 
G. Holt, Celia A. Marine], Irving L. Keith.* 

One Term — Martha S. Hall, Rosanna H. McManamin,* Delia G. 
Sprague, G. Walter Peterson, Ralph L. Ripley, Harry I. McLaugh- 
lin, Charlie E. Hyde, Harry C. Libby. 



i5 



INTERMEDIATE No. 8. 

The Year — Luella Merrill, Frank Small.* 

Two Terms — Viola Green, Lillie Sweat,* Lena Small,* Hannah 
Shields,* Hattie Hall,* Herman Shaw.* 

One Term — Celia Marinel, Lena Bridgford, Charlie Hyde, 
Harry Libby, Albert Peterson, Fred Chandler, Augustus Duncan, 
James Leahey.* 

PRIMARY No. 8. 

The Year — Carrie Cook, Walter Marinel. 

Two Terms — Delia Shields, Florence Sampson, Eliza McLaugh- 
lin, Nellie Dunigan, George Lumbert. 

One Term — Viola Greene, Georgia McEnnis,* Cora Pearson,* 
Hattie Cook, Edith Merrill, Grace Merrill, Annie Woodard, 
Florence Shaw,* James Leahey,* Eddie McEnnis,* Gardner Ripley, 
George Spaulding, Arthur Wheeler, Willie Chandler, George 
Swain, Clarence Spaulding. 

GRAMMAR No. 9. 

The Year — Lottie L. Snow. 
One Term — Bertha V. Parkhurst. 

PRIMARY No. 9. 

The Year — Freddie A. Snow. 

Two Terms — Charles Daw, Oscar Naylor, Edward B. Mason, 
Arthur Mason. 

One Term — Florence May Winship, Louisa Pelsue, Myra L. 
Coburn, Lottie Hale,* Nettie Harrington, Minnie Pelsue, Lilla Cun- 
ningham, Freddie Daw, Freddie Hale, John E. Dane, Charlie Jor- 
dan, Carl Spaulding, Warren Marshall, Walter Mason, Roy Mason.* 



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